Little Black Jacket part 3 – day 1

This is part 3 of my mini series on the Chanel jacket course I attended in March.

See here for part 1 about inspiration and here for part 2 on materials!

Today I’m sharing my progress from day 1 of the course.

I packed up my machine, pattern, fabric, notions and a travel sewing kit and set off to Roundhay!

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Gillian the course instructor advised making a toile with at least one sleeve set in and bringing it along for discussion on the first day.

I traced all my pieces rather than cutting as I was sure I’d need to apply some “creative” sizing.

I traced a size 12 at the neck/shoulder/armhole/bust and graded out to a size 14 waist and 16 hip.

What I ended up with was pretty good I think. The shoulder length/armhole needed some adjustment but the fit across the bust waist and hips felt good. For a non-fastening jacket the fronts meet and it doesn’t gape open too much.
Overall I felt it could have been snugger and Gillian agreed. She also helped me remove 3cm length from the sleeve.

She advised that although the toile is an excellent indicator of fit it’s often better to fit the jackets again mid-construction because of the wool behaving differently to calico.

Down to business. First up we cut out fabric and lining pieces, remembering to take into consideration nap, pattern matching and in my case the one way shine of satin. I didn’t use interfacing in the end as my wool had enough stability.
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The construction was not as expected. Instead of constructing the outer shell and lining separately and the attaching the two, the corresponding shell and lining pieces were basted together and machine quilted.

This took the majority of the day. We chatted as we went and I made the most of the tips that were shared ready for when I make my second jacket. Here’s a few things I took note of:

  • For a truly expensive looking jacket it’s not enough to pattern-match your fabric in the seams and the sleeves, you should also be matching the pockets.
  • An inch of seam allowance helps you be safer rather than sorry with expensive fabric.
  • Don’t overpress your fabric… in fact barely touch it! Wool is most likely to show marks where you’ve squashed it.
  • It’s not worth overlocking your pieces even if they’re fraying like no-one’s business, as you’re just creating bulk at the seams and wool is plenty bulky enough! Just pink the edges if you need to do something.

Sorry it’s taken so long to post this. I’ve just started a new job and also Mr AR has been unwell. More excitement drafted and ready to post in Part 4 about day 2 of my class.

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Careless cutting – NL 6808 take 2

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Oh yes I was smug. I had “conquered” New Look 6808.

I was dancing around the living room in my finished top and thought hell yeah I’m gonna make another!!

I decided to up the fun factor. Thick blue plaid with 3/4 sleeves so it’d be super warm and snuggly!

I whizzed through it. And I lined up my plaid pretty well I thought… bust darts excluded obviously. More delicious smugness.

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I was even deliberating adding an exposed metal zipper for extra cool factor. Oh yes I’m that cool ladies…

Then it came to the sleeves:
Attempt 1 – went mental and forgot the direction of my plaid. Ended up with them in a blatantly different direction to the rest of top.

Attempt 2 – correct plaid direction.  Waaaay too much ease.

Attempt 3 – used tips from Casey and Green Apples on reducing ease from sleeves. Reduced too much and couldn’t lift arms/get top off again/thought it wanted me dead.

Attempt 4 – cap sleeves a la version 1. Tried to remove less ease than previous attempt. Still removed too much. Again the top tried to choke me to death but with less vigour this time.

Attempt 5- oh wait I’m out of plaid!! So I resigned myself to having a sleeveless top. Rather than buy more just to mess around with sleeves.

So I started snipping the frayed edges down to apply bias tape (of course they were frayed after all this sewing and unpicking) and had some kind of deranged spasm!

I snipped right into the top! Right in there, nice and big and unrepairable. Oh and did I mention I’m out of plaid!?

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Pffftt…. crapzola.

So my top just earned itself a nice place in the bin. At least now I can move on to something else.

Hello Polka Dot Truffle party dress! I’ve left you alone for too long.

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New Look 6808 – FINALLY!

Yaaaaaaaaay I’ve finally finished a new look 6808 top after buying the pattern nearly a year ago.

Why so long you might ask? Well it took me this long to fit it properly.

I made four attempts. FOUR! Yeesh.

I worked out I’m a 8 around the neck, a 10 at the arm holes and bust, a 12 at the waist and a 14 at the hips.

Now I have the perfect fit though. I even added a centre back seam to help the fit.

I used a purply-black poly micro-fibre fabric that I’d used as lining for my fake cambie.

And some pink poly scraps I had for the collar and the sleeve lining.

I’ve never encountered a pattern with lined sleeves before.

Little odd but love the effect I was able to create here.

I drafted the collar myself. I used the neck facings to work out the general size of the collar I needed and a french curve on the front collar pieces. I wish I’d curved them slightly closer together.

There’s a small gap at the front that I don’t mind too much but wish I’d spotted earlier.

I put the collar together using instructions in my Reader’s Digest Sewing Guide.

It’s really well illustrated and has little tips for each different type of collar you want to create / attach.

I didn’t want my collar to have a centre back seam so I had to make sure the collar fit perfectly given my odd extra bit of construction.

The hem isn’t wonky at the back, that’s just where the top slipped on the hanger.

In other news I also got a gift in the post! The pattern I won from Dotty Doodle.

And look how cutely she wrapped it up for me.

NL6808 Review:

Positives:

It’s a super wearable straightforward to sew top that can be made dressy or casual as required.

There are good variations to create the perfect top you need with long sleeves, collar variations.

And it’s like a blank canvas for embellishment!

Nuff said right?

Negatives:

For me it was determining the sizing. I am a freaky body type though. Crazily small shoulders and neckline, small bust, bigger waist, even bigger hips. And it took me a while to grade the pattern correctly. What made it more difficult for me is that all the sizes aren’t on a single pattern pieces. They cover only a few, e.g. 8, 10, 12 with another for 14, 16, 18. Great for anyone who wants to grade between those sizes. Not so great for me.

Oh well.

Would I make it again? And what would I do differently?

YES!! Hell yes I’m making this again. Now I’ve mastered the fit I’m going to be all over this pattern. I’m going to make one with buttons down the back. Another with the long sleeves. Another in view c with the side collar/bow. Another with a pleated panel on the front. Another…. oh I’ll shut up because you get the jist!

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