Dresses

Ditsy Butterick 6758

Happy bank holiday weekend everyone! I’ve just finished photographing a new dress and I’m really hoping the weather stays nice enough for me to wear it out and about this weekend. This is Butterick 6758 from the latest summer collection. It’s a really nice day dress pattern with drawstring waist and grown-on sleeves (aka drafted to be attached to the bodice), plus the option for a hem ruffle! I chose to make view A but without the sleeve bands. And I changed the drawstring to a waist belt.

almond rock in butterick 6758 loose fitting dress red leopard ditsy ecovera viscose from rainbow fabrics

The dress turned out so great. Easy to wear and fit, plus it will transition from summer to winter easily! I sewed it over the course of a few evenings, taking my time with it so I could slow down and enjoy the process.

almond rock in butterick 6758 loose fitting dress red leopard ditsy ecovera viscose from rainbow fabrics

My fabric is from Rainbow Fabrics, an online seller of deadstock fabric. This means the fabric is limited quantities, ie left over from ready to wear lines or excess stock from fabric wholesalers and once it’s gone it’s gone… which is the case for this print I’m afraid. It was labelled Ecovera viscose and they do have this same fabric base in other prints so maybe take a look. It’s unusual as a viscose as it has a crepe like texture with that familiar bubbled pebbly surface. I think it works perfectly for this dress as it has enough drape to gather nicely but still feels substantial to wear.

almond rock in butterick 6758 loose fitting dress red leopard ditsy ecovera viscose from rainbow fabrics

I love grown-on sleeves on me. Not because I don’t enjoy sewing sleeves, that’s not it. I just have very narrow shoulders and I love how grown-on sleeves broaden my top and balance everything out. Plus, when slightly oversized like this they look and feel super breezy! The trick with grown-on sleeves though is to recognise how the seam will fall down your arm, you’re asking a straight line to curve over your shoulder and down the arm so you will naturally get a small curve at the very end if using a soft fabric as it bounces up at the hem. A slightly stiffer fabric will hold itself away from your arm but you might not like that look. One trick that helps is to snip into the seam allowance from the shoulder point downwards every 2cm or so this helps the seam allowance lie flatter along the arm. But this shouldn’t be tried on a fabric that frays very easily.

almond rock in butterick 6758 loose fitting dress red leopard ditsy ecovera viscose from rainbow fabrics I use a similar technique on the underarm of a grown-on sleeve, I snip into the seam allowance of the curve in a couple of places and then overlock the side seam allowances together letting the snips stay slightly open as I go over the fabric. Alternatively you can trim quite close so there is minimal seam allowance pulling on the curve.

almond rock in butterick 6758 loose fitting dress red leopard ditsy ecovera viscose from rainbow fabrics

I’m wearing my dress with red converse right now but I can easily see it with tights and a cardigan in colder weather. I made a size 14 and graded out the hips to add another 1″ at the side seams. To share this evenly I divided by 2 so I knew how much to add to the front and the back. Then divided by 2 again to work out how much needed adding to each side seam. So by adding a 1/4″ to the front and back side seam on my tissue pieces this added up to 1″ in total. Have you made this dress? Or are tempted to make it now? Please let me know in the comments!

2 Comments

  • Annie

    This pattern caught my eye when it was released, but I haven’t made it yet. The top reminds me a bit of the Fringe dress bodice, but I like that the buttons continue down the length of the dress without a waist seam. Your version turned out beautifully! I find rayon and viscose crepes easy and flattering fabrics to work with.

  • Barbara

    So pretty! Hope you get plenty of chances to wear it before the seasons change. Thanks for the tip about snipping into the shoulder seam at the end to avoid the way that fabric tends to stick out. I have always hated that ! Knowing that trick opens up the opportunity to use a slightly stiffer fabric on these type of designs.

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